Beaded machines, Beadwork

Mobius warped square kaleidocycle

A while ago I came across a youtube video with instructions on how to make a Mobius kaleidocycle out of folded paper hypers – a kaleidocycle with a twist! So of course I had to try making one out of warped squares!

It worked! And it’s great fun to play with. It’s just a strip of 7 warped squares made into a Mobius strip (i.e. twisted once before being joined into a ring). But it also cycles!

BeadMechanics_MobiusWarpedSqKaleidocycle_Join

If the colours look familiar that’s because they’re the CGB prism colourway!

I don’t know if it would work with regular tetrahedra, but I think the warped squares distort more than a beadwork tetrahedron would and allow it to turn.

BeadMechanics_MobiusWarpedSqKaleidocycle

This is actually the second Mobius kaleidocycle I’ve made – while I was planning out a peyote version of the trefoil knot kaleidocycle I discovered that it also has a twist (which is awesome but did cause a few issues with the pattern I had planned for it!).

It would be interesting to see if other Mobius cycles can work – maybe with a longer strip of squares more than one twist is possible!

Beadwork, Polyhedra, Tutorials

Rick Rack Dodecahedron (with Tutorial!)

I was challenged a while ago to see if I could make a dodecahedron out of rick racks. After a bit of experimenting I ended up with this, a Contemporary Geometric Beadwork rick rack dodecahedron!

rickrack_dodecahedron_2_beadmechanics

It’s made from small 5-sided rick racks joined together with warped squares. The rick racks are the light blue beads you can see, zipped together at the top with dark blue beads. The warped squares joining them together are the dark blue diamonds you can see in-between each rick rack.

rickrack_dodecahedron_3_beadmechanics

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Beadwork, Beadwork objects, Polyhedra

Sunburst

I don’t seem to have had much time for beadwork recently, but a few months ago I did manage to finish a new piece: a sunburst dodecahedron!

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It uses Sue Harle’s tubular diagonal peyote technique, which is just fantastic for geometric work like this as it’s beautifully flexible, but still strong enough to hold the shape together.

I’ve been playing with this idea for about a year but couldn’t really get it to click, I think mostly as I wasn’t sure that it would work (a feeling that stayed with me all the way up until it was finished!). There was also a bit of hasty re-engineering of my initial idea half way through (I might have forgotten how many edges a dodecahedron has…), but it did work in the end and I’m very happy with how it turned out. Its only downside is that it’s really hard to photograph!

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I really want to try taking this idea further by trying a similar approach with other shapes – although I’m not sure yet if the angles will work out for other polyhedra. It’d also be fun to try two nested shapes, maybe a dodecahedron and an icosahedron, or two dodecahedrons, but I’m still contemplating how to join them together so they stay centered.

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I also really like these metallic yellow delicas. I don’t often use yellow in my designs (you might have noticed that blue is my go-to colour!) but I’m glad I tried venturing out if my colour comfort zone to try this.

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I have started writing a tutorial for this shape too! I’m still a bit apprehensive about drawing the diagrams for it at the moment, as it’s very 3 dimensional and hard to show on a flat page – need to spend some time thinking back to maths lessons about 3D projections!

Beaded machines

Trefoil Knot Kaleidocycle

A while ago I found an interesting paper about rotating rings of tetrahedra (aka kaleidocycles) by Jean Pedersen┬╣. Apart from some great instructions on how to make them by braiding two strips of paper together it also mentions that with enough tetrahedra, a kaleidocycle can be tied into a knot and still rotate.

So of course I had to try this! The paper says that the minimum number of tetrahedra required is 22, which is quite a lot. I decided to make them out of bugle beads to test the idea. I made a long strip of them using right angle weave (although in this case the angles aren’t right-angles) and illusion cord . When I had enough tetrahedra I tied the strip into a trefoil knot – this is just an overhand knot with the ends joined together. The completed kaleidocycle looks like a bit like 3 normal kaleidocycle merged together:

TrefoilKnotKaleidocycle_BeadMechanics_1

Now for the moment of truth – does it rotate properly?

The answer: yes! It took a few tries to work out how to get it to turn properly, but it’s great fun to play with. Here’s a video:

I think this is my favourite kaleidocycle so far! I want to make a peyote tetrahedra version, but the 88 triangles needed might be going to take me a while!

 

┬╣The paper is “Braided Rotating Rings”, Jean J. Pedersen (The Mathematical Gazette, 62, 1978).

Beadwork, Polyhedra, Tutorials

New tutorial!

I’ve finished the tutorial for my first beaded icosahedron – now named Whirlwind! You can find the tutorial in my brand new etsy shop: www.etsy.com/shop/beadmechanics.

whirlwind_beadmechanics_1

I’ve been working on this for a while – it’s been quite a learning experience! The tutorial is 21 pages with more than 60 photos and diagrams – there’s also a net for a paper version of the model you can cut out and make to help with putting the beadwork together!

I’d always intended to make this icosahedron again so I took the opportunity to take photos as I went along so I could write a tutorial. The new version is actually the mirror image of the original – so now I have a matching pair! (Some brief instructions on how to make a second one so you have a matching pair are also included in the tutorial!)

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Happy beading!